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Thread subject: Pam's OBS of Wed May 19 10:57 am
Name Date Message
RonS 05/19/04 12:36 pm Pam indicated a pattern of the lager chick(s) feeding until they are full before they allow the smaller chick(s) get their fair share. If I remember correctly from last year, that pattern will continue only until the chicks get bigger and require (demand!) more food. At that point the larger chicks really get after the smaller chick and things become very difficult to watch.
In all of the reading that the collective group has done, has anyone come across a case where more that two chicks in a single nest have made it fledging? Ever hopeful :~]
Cecilia 05/19/04 02:52 pm I went back to Gessner's book, "Return of the Osprey" to be sure...and yes...he was quite clear that in two of the nests he watched three chicks fledged and he saw them fishing and flying around for weeks before they migrated in mid-September (he was on the Cape). In one of those nests chick #3 brutally murdered #4 (his words), then went on to become the lowest in the pecking order and almost starved. But, he was a fighter and although smaller and a lot hungrier, he fledged with his siblings and learned to fish for himself. So there is reason to hope - if the fish supply holds up, the weather cooperates and #3 turns out to be strong enough to take the competition. However, I think things will get pretty rough. If #4 does hatch it seems like he has no chance and #3 has a long battle ahead of him. Maybe Dave or Tom have more info?
Shelley 05/19/04 03:21 pm I realize it's different for every species, but for the red-tailed hawk (also a raptor, right?) might it be similar? In the book, *Red-Tails in Love* (and we saw it in the pbs show this week, 3 chicks hatched and all three fledged safely.

We can hope!!!!
Barbara 05/20/04 08:39 am Not last year, but the year before, there were 3 successful fledglings in a Greenport nest. It got REALLY crowded before they all started flying and hanging around in the trees.
Mike 05/21/04 09:02 am Two years ago, our backyard nest produced three fledglings. All were similarly sized and tempered.
Kathy 05/21/04 10:31 am Hi Mike, you have me curious. Did you build your own Osprey platform?
Mike 05/21/04 05:27 pm Yes, we did, although we might re-build it this summer. We lost our original pair somewhere along the line after three successful seasons, and no one else has taken up residence. My real estate broker says remodeling goes a long way, we figure it might work for avian property as well.

Copyright © 2004 DPOF

Tom Throwe
Last modified: Fri Dec 31 23:49:43 EST 2004