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Thread subject: More Evidence to Support One of our Theories
Name Date Message
Tiger 07/22/05 04:27 am Remember how we were discussing how wind might affect fledging. Well it seems that wind did afect the fledging of the first Rutland chick.

Interestingly they are about ten days younger than ours and the first one fledged, perhaps involuntarily, two days after ours.

See:

http://www.ospreys.org.uk/AWOP/Breeding2005B.htm
Tiger 07/22/05 04:28 am The relevant bit is:

18 July: First flight in a squall

On 18 July the weather changed. After nearly a week of hot, windless, sultry weather, a cooler wind arrrived from the north-west bringing sudden heavy thundery showers. This change was just what was needed to provoke one of the chicks at the breeding nest to launch itself into the air for the first time.
For days they had been thinking about it, with hops across the nest, multiple wingflaps and lifting up a few feet. The adults had been recorded flying low and slow past the nest, calling to the young. The monitors had been on the edge of their seats and confidently predicting that it would come at any time.

Then when it was least expected, with humans racing for cover from the rain, one chick suddenly took off. Up and up she circled (we think it was one of the two females) with the adults flying nearby and calling. Four full minutes the flight lasted before the juvenile landed back, with some precision, on the nest.

A very exciting experience for volunteers John and Sheila Davies, who were the lucky ones to witness it all. Very soon the phone lines were buzzing with the brilliant news and expectations that the next few days would be very exciting ones with more early flights being seen.

22 July: More flights - eventually!

Well, we were wrong. For the next few days no further flights by the chicks were seen at all. It could be that the first flight during the rain squall was in fact an involuntary one. It was not until the morning of 21 July that we saw regular short flights by both the female chicks, with ring numbers 30 and 31.
karen 07/22/05 08:54 am Thanks Tiger it is really interesting to read about the adult behavior during fledging which is something we cannot see in our nest but we did see Betty leave right after the first chick fledged.
Celeste 07/22/05 09:04 am Thank you Tiger.....I suspected that the wind gives the urge to the chicks for "all systems go"!

Copyright © 2006 DPOF

Tom Throwe
Last modified: Sat Feb 18, 2006