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Thread subject: Mississippi Delta and its importance for migrating birds.
Name Date Message
Marie 09/09/05 08:14 pm I have Google in the last hour info re.Birds of the Mississippi Delta and its importance for migrating birds. Well it is astounding how vital this area is. 403 species of bird can be seen there, which makes Victoria's 368+ bird species number look puny in comparison. Worth a look if you have time.
Anne 09/10/05 03:26 pm Marie, I have just watched the evening news on TV. The clip was about the police still searching for survivors by boat. I was horrified to see several birds covered in oil and obviously beyond help.
Melanie 09/12/05 10:27 am There have been reports that currently you have to get about 60 miles north of the coast before you see birds. I know the Gulf Coast is a *very* major jumping off point for most of the East Coasts' song birds, but I would imagine that there is not a whole lot birdie resources on the coastline for them to stock up on before they flyout over the Gulf of Mexico. Hopefully they can do a lot of stocking up before they reach that point.

I suspect that a lot of birds instinctively got out of the line of fire before Katrina made landfall - I can remember when I lived in Florida (Panhandle and Southern) as a kid that the day or two before a hurricane we weould go through this "calm before the storm" thing, and birds would kind of disappear. And in the aftermath and cleanup, I don't ever remember seeing any dead birds. Lots of palm fronds and coconuts, but no dead birds. And they came back fairly quickly. We had one hurricane that we actually went through the eye (talk about eerie experiences) but mostly we were in the inner bands. We went through Camille, but happily only the outer parts of it, which were bad enough.

But here's a bit of really bizarre hurricane trivia: it is not uncommon for sea birds to get "trapped" in the eye of a hurricane - where it's nice and sunny and calm. Apparently they kind of travel along until it falls apart.
Marie 09/12/05 11:24 am Very interesting Melanie.Hopefully that is exactly where some hide if they can get through to that place of calm in the first place. Sounds like you have really experienced hurricanes.
Yes I expect we have no idea the total damage in relation to birds and animals at this time from Katrina. They are still looking for 8 I believe sealions that were left in the Marine park in NO. Some they saved by putting into Hotel pools.

Copyright © 2006 DPOF

Tom Throwe
Last modified: Sat Feb 18, 2006