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Thread subject: Update and a few interesting links from Rob Bierregaard
Name Date Message
karen 03/26/07 08:49 am Copy from my email this morning


Greetings.

Adult Ospreys are settling in to new and old territories
across New England. None of our birds has started to move. After all,
they're still teenagers--and what teenager ever got up on time?
All the birds seem to be fine. Jaws', basking in the glory of
his Animal Planet adventures, sends sporadic signals from the Gulf of
Venezuela. Based on Jaws' first return to Martha's Vineyard last year
in early May, we shouldn't be surprised that Conanicus and Homer
haven't started north yet.
While you're waiting for our birds to start moving, if you
need a satellite-migration map fix, there are a couple of very
interesting options. 16 Bar-tailed Godwits are were outfitted with
PTTs (satellite transmitters) in New Zealand. They've begun their
remarkable trip all the way back to Alaska. (Their travels across the
Pacific make the 400-700 mile trips Ospreys make across the Caribbean
look like a walk in the park). The website tracking their progress
is: http://www.werc.usgs.gov/sattrack/shorebirds/
You can also follow Pintails at a related site:
http://www.werc.usgs.gov/pinsat/maps.html (Pintail
populations have declined dramatically over the past 30 years. This
project is trying to get some data to help understand why. For
details go to http://www.werc.usgs.gov/pinsat/plan/html )

And if you really need a raptor map fix, the Falcon Research
Group has recently tagged 7 Peregrine Falcons deep in southern Chile.
Some of these birds should be heading all the way to the Canadian or
Alaskan arctic soon.
http://www.frg.org/SC_PEFA_more.htm

That should keep you busy until our birds move!

--
Rob Bierregaard
Biology Dept.
UNC-Charlotte
9201 University City Blvd.
Charlotte NC 28223

704 333 2405
http://www.bioweb.uncc.edu/bierregaard
Nancy L 03/26/07 09:22 am Thanks, Karen.
Pam 03/26/07 12:13 pm Lots to check up on there :)) Thank you Karen.
Marie 03/26/07 07:10 pm ooooh thanks Karen such amazing stuff.........

I had heared that Bar-tailed Godwits make remarkable migrations and mostly over the Pacific, flying non-stop for hours and hours, dare I say days. Wow. Birds are amazing.

Copyright © 2007 DPOF

Tom Throwe
Last modified: Sat Feb 17, 2007