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Thread subject: Natural Osprey Nest at Blackwater
Name Date Message
FOB Webmaster 04/25/10 02:15 pm Only my osprey friends here could really appreciate my excitement yesterday in discovering a natural osprey nest near the Wildlife Drive at Blackwater Refuge.

I captured a short video of the nest and the pair. They definitely appear to have egg(s).

The last time I visited the refuge, I thought I heard osprey calls from those trees, which normally host perching bald eagles. I drove around to the other side of the trees to see if there was a water platform on that side of the river, but there wasn't.

So yesterday I was looking in the trees for eagles, and discovered the osprey pair. They were the ones who were calling last time.

What's interesting is that there is a human-made water platform near this spot, but no osprey pair has claimed it. Instead the ospreys chose the trees.

I think their tree is a dead loblolly pine tree, so no idea how long it will last, but the nest looked in good shape. I asked Bob Quinn to see if he could get some close-up photos.

A volunteer at the refuge said the refuge does have some natural osprey nests, but this is the first I've known of that was easily visible from the Drive.
cathleen 04/25/10 02:22 pm What a great discovery! Can't wait for you to see the chicks when they come!
Kelly 04/25/10 04:17 pm That's terrific, Lisa! :)))
Pam 04/25/10 04:39 pm A wonderful discovery for you Lisa. I love that word "Loblolly"....never heard of it here in England.
Melanie 04/25/10 04:51 pm Lolblolly pines are native to the southern US - they are VERY tall - reaching well over 100 feet, a fairly straight trunk (great for timber) and tend to carry their branching/limbs up bear the top third of the tree. They grow well in wet areas so Blackwater is a great place for them.
Anne UK1 04/25/10 05:29 pm Oh lucky you Lisa. I bet you couldn't believe your eyes!
Trishrg 04/25/10 05:42 pm How exciting to find this nest. Thanks so much for sharing the video. And please keep up posted on it's progress.
FOB Webmaster 04/25/10 05:49 pm I love loblolly pines. Not only is it a fun name, but they're beautiful trees, and they make a wonderful noise when the wind blows in their tall tops. Sounds like a babbling brook.

Our eagles love them. It's their favorite tree for nesting.

I've been told the loblolly doesn't go too far beyond Blackwater's region -- we're near the top of their northern reach.
Shelley 04/25/10 07:59 pm Great! And what a terrific zoom, at the end. It really gives great perspective. Keep us posted!
Tiger 04/26/10 04:12 am Great news Lisa. Shows that the ospreys are not losing the skill of building nests for themselves.
Celeste 04/26/10 05:20 am Nice sturdy nest on those great trees! Great video! Every now and again I see a natural nest, and it's always nice to know that an osprey can get back to it's "roots" in this crazy urban world!
martyc35 04/26/10 12:32 pm A very nice video, Lisa. Both the ospreys and the loblolly pines look great!
marty
Lori 04/26/10 01:12 pm WOW! Looks like a well-built nest. Hope the family gets to stay & use it for a long long time :)
Marie 04/26/10 01:42 pm Now that is really going back to Nature.
Great image Lisa.
cathy 04/28/10 05:09 am Yay! They haven't forgotten how to build a natural nest!

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